Regina passes bylaws for Uber adoption

Published: February 26, 2019

Updated: February 28, 2019

Author: Luke Jones

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Regina has become the latest Canadian city to create regulations to accommodate ride-sharing companies, which could allow Uber and Lyft to enter the market within months.

New bylaws were passed on Monday after the Regina city council voted unanimously to pass the proposed regulations.

“If you look at the timelines that happened in Saskatoon, it was a couple of months from when the city passed the bylaw, to when there was an application available to you, to when you were able to see cars on the road,” said Michael van Hemmen, business manager for Uber in Western Canada.

“We’re very excited about the opportunity to be able to provide more affordable, reliable, safe transportation options to the residents of Regina,” he said after Monday night’s city council meeting.

Under the new bylaw, Uber and other ride-sharing companies can begin operations in Regina. While Uber has disagreed with regulations in other cities and decided not to enter markets, the company seems on board with Regina’s laws.

Notices will now be posted online to recruit drivers. Under Regina’s bylaw, drivers wishing to work with a ride-sharing company will need to have a valid driver’s licence, undergo a criminal record check, have a vehicle inspection, and conduct a vehicle driver history check.

Regina’s adoption of ride-sharing follows Saskatoon debuting regulations in Saskatchewan earlier in the month, allowing Uber to start operations from Feb, 6. Regina Mayor Michael Fougere said he talked with Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark about the introduction of ride-sharing legislation.

“I talked with Mayor Clark at SUMA … and it was a very simple process,” said Fougere.

“I don’t see it being a difficult process to go through.”

“We hope anytime now that Uber, Lyft or any other ride-share company that wants to start will actually make an application and begin the process,” he added. “As of right now, it’s completely legal to do it.”